Asia’s most dangerous diving spots

Diving

Diving isn’t always full of tropical fish and warm waters. Source: Jakob Owens / Unsplash

SCUBA DIVING, snorkeling, even just holding your breath and going for a swim is normally thought of as a fun activity.

Imagine a world of calm down with the fishes, in a warm ocean exploring what the naked eye can’t see above the waves.

But like every sport, diving has an extreme version, and Asia is home to some of the most notorious spots.

Away from tropical fish, glistening sun on the ocean’s surface and out of reach of a golden beach, these are Asia’s most dangerous diving spots.

The Shaft Sinkhole, Mount Gambier, Australia

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In an unsuspecting field in South Australia lies a little hole, which is also the entrance to the world’s most dangerous cave dive.

Discovered in the late 1930s when a farmer’s horse partially fell into the cavern, it wasn’t used until 1965 when the rubble from a demolished house was emptied down there, some of it is visible today.

The cave is very much unexplored, incredibly dark and full nooks and crannies.

Divers taking on The Shaft enter the cave separately from their breathing apparatus as there’s not enough space for both.

Once inside, air must be used sparingly to avoid running out and drowning.

The darkness, loss of direction and misty water from silt deposits have claimed the lives of many divers at this spot.

There have been no reports of fascinating species deep in the cave, so the expeditions are mostly to induce adrenaline and collect “dive bragging rights”.

Samaesan Hole, Samaesan Bay, Thailand

This diving spot is like a place the sea forgot to love. The 85-meter-deep hole penetrates the seabed and delves down into a spooky abyss.

The opening is far wider than The Shaft Sinkhole in Australia, but it is the currents which will get you here.

Diving in the Gulf of Thailand’s deepest site is not for amateurs.

Multiple torches, diving computers, and technical diving gear are a minimum requirement, even for experienced divers.

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Unprepared divers can be thrown way off course by the swelling ocean and become fatally disoriented.

But darkness and currents aside, the unexploded bombs in the hole also earn this spot a place on the list.

Samaesan Hole was used as a military dumping ground in World War Two but hopefully, the sea water has eroded any detonators by now.

Blue Hole, Dahab Red Sea

Over the other side of Asia, on the coast of Saudi Arabia, lies the 100-meter-deep Blue Hole.

No public record exists of exactly how many people have died in this spot, but locals from the Dahab area suggest it’s more than 200 in recent years, according to The Guardian.

Tarek Omar, a technical diver from Dahab, has earned himself the title of “bone collector” as he has retrieved more than 20 bodies from the hole since 1997.

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The site is said to be cursed by a young bride who drowned herself here after refusing an arranged marriage.

Many of the accidents occur as drivers try to find the notorious Blue Hole Arch at around 52 meters.

Divers either spot a hole they mistake for the arch and get lost in an unknown cavern or miss it entirely and descend to dangerous depths.

Would you dare dive into the deep dark abyss?