Ever wondered what you’re allowed to take from a hotel room?

A couple checking into a hotel. Source: Shutterstock

A STRANGE sense of kleptomania overcomes a lot of people when staying at a hotel.

Quietening your inner conscience as you debate whether to take the yucca plant from the corner of the room. Hoping that the housekeeping won’t judge you as you stuff as many complimentary toiletries as your toiletry bag can hold.

But what exactly are you allowed to take? The snuggly robes, chic slippers, all the exotic teabags, the memo-pad and branded pen?

Perhaps you plan on doing a “Chandler and Ross” and keep on requesting stuff you don’t need, just because, well, it’s complimentary?

Of course, the mini shampoo bottles and shower caps are yours for the taking. But did you know there is, in fact, an etiquette when it comes to hotel room freebies?

According to Isabelle Pinson, Vice President of Hotels.com, “the general rule is that small, consumable products like toiletries and stationary are yours to take and use as you’d like.”

This is great news for those who forget to pack their shampoo and conditioner on a business trip or a short weekend getaway.

Most complimentary toiletries are perfectly compact in 100ml bottles – easily storable and unlikely to push your baggage over the weight limit.

If you’re staying at a luxury hotel, you’ll be happy to know that branded toothbrushes, toothpaste, cotton pads, combs, earbuds, sleep masks and even emery boards are often included in the package.

If you’ve ever stayed in a hotel in Europe or America, you will have most likely found a Gideon International Bible stowed away in the top drawer of your bedside table, you’re actually allowed to take this home with you too.

So, where do hotels draw the line?

“Take the Bible, not the towels”, said Gideon International spokesperson, Woody Murray, when speaking to NBC News.

“Our statistics show one-quarter of all travelers will read the Bible in the hotel rooms and each Bible has the potential to reach 2,300 people over its six-year life expectancy.

Read away, share to your heart’s content and recite passages from the Bible, but God-forbid do not take the hotel towels.

According to a study conducted by The Telegraph, 68 percent of hotel guests have admitted to taking towels home with them at least once.

If you’re one of those people who just love a freebie then try to find an unattended housekeeping trolley in the corridor, grab what you can and inconspicuously stroll away. Most hotels are fine with you taking a little extra.

But if that “little extra” is linen, bath towels, robes, batteries from remote controls, light bulbs, artworks or even pillows and duvets, you can expect it all to be charged to your credit card as soon as the hotel discovers what kleptomania has taken place.

Plenty of hotels have onsite gift shops where you can purchase branded robes, fluffy towels and even the mattress because there is no way you can sneak a queen-sized bed out the door with you.