These are predicted to be the hottest Asian destinations in 2025

Hottest Asian Destinations

Jami-Ul-Alfar Mosque, people and tuk tuks fill Sri Lanka’s capital, Colombo. Source: Shutterstock

GLOBALIZATION has been the key to making the world smaller which is a blessing for eager travelers wanting to explore every corner of the globe. 

Airlines have made it super simple and relatively cheap to travel. The next aviation milestone is producing the world’s longest flight, with Singapore Airlines hoping to reclaim the title with its 19-hour direct flight from New York to Singapore.

The products of globalization have also allowed Londoners to pop over to Paris for dinner, Singaporeans to have a spot of lunch in Malaysia, and Beijingers to attend a meeting in Shanghai and get back home in time for dinner.

Essentially, the world is becoming a much smaller place, which is great for passport stamp collectors.

Global mobility has also lessened cross-border tensions and nationally shared fears of “others” as people are able to experience different cultures from their own firsthand and develop an understanding away from negative media portrayals.

However, globalization has also led to a trend of overtourism in destinations which don’t have the infrastructure to handle visitor numbers.

This tourism stampede has had devastating effects on destinations once renowned for natural beauty. Famously, the Philippines’ Boracay island was closed earlier this year due to insufficient waste disposal systems.

Maya Bay in Thailand has also experienced shocking environmental damage after flocks of tourists wanted to see the set of Danny Boyle’s hit film, The Beach.

Asia Times pointed out “overcrowding and the establishment of typical tourism-focused businesses, such as clubs, bars, and souvenir shops, overwhelm local businesses – and rowdy and unmanageable tourist behavior is common.”

This can create a negative image for a tourist destination and unwittingly attract the “wrong crowd.”

However, with the rate of global tourism increasing by a remarkable average of around five to seven percent every year, overtourism may be part of every destination’s story soon.

The rapid growth of the travel sphere shouldn’t put anyone off from seeking new adventures and exploring new cultures. It is, however, important to be a responsible traveler to avoid offending locals and leaving a footprint that won’t wash away.

Nevertheless, UNWTO World Tourism Barometer discovered Asia-Pacific received 324 million international arrivals in 2017, with Southeast Asia’s visitor intake growing by 10 percent. That’s pretty significant.

UNWTO’s data proves Asia is on the bucket list of most travelers, perhaps even yours. With this increase, there’s a risk of Asia’s most popular destinations experiencing disastrous overtourism before you get to visit.

But thankfully, travel comparison website TravelSupermarket.com has combined UNWTO’s data with trends from Euromonitor International’s Top 100 City Destinations Ranking report and predicted which international cities will be the world’s most popular by 2025.

According to the results, Asia will see the biggest tourism increase as 24 of the 25 top cities are on the “Eastern Land” continent.

Scroll down to discover the current and forecasted visitor numbers of the cities predicted to top traveler’s bucket lists by 2025. Then book your trip before everyone else does.

Jakarta, Indonesia

  • 2017 arrivals: 3,587,500 
  • 2025 arrivals: 7,185,900
  • Percentage increase: 100

Denpasar, Indonesia

  • 2017 arrivals: 6,238,300
  • 2025 arrivals: 12,313,000
  • Percentage increase: 97

Jaipur, India

  • 2017 arrivals: 5,088,600
  • 2025 arrivals: 9,550,100
  • Percentage increase: 88

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • 2017 arrivals: 5,500,000
  • 2025 arrivals: 10,201,500
  • Percentage increase: 85

Chennai, India

  • 2017 arrivals: 5,186,300
  • 2025 arrivals: 9,589,200
  • Percentage increase: 85

Agra, India

  • 2017 arrivals: 6,744,400
  • 2025 arrivals: 12,417,600
  • Percentage increase: 84

Phuket, Thailand

  • 2017 arrivals: 12,079,500
  • 2025 arrivals: 22,119,600
  • Percentage increase: 83

Delhi, India

  • 2017 arrivals: 10,257,000
  • 2025 arrivals: 18,757,200
  • Percentage increase: 83

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

  • 2017 arrivals: 3,016,900
  • 2025 arrivals: 5,435,800
  • Percentage increase: 80

Siem Reap, Cambodia

  • 2017 arrivals: 2,337,600
  • 2025 arrivals: 4,211,900
  • Percentage increase: 80

Mumbai, India

  • 2017 arrivals: 8,884,900
  • 2025 arrivals: 15,905,500
  • Percentage increase: 79

Kolkata, India

  • 2017 arrivals: 2,550,400
  • 2025 arrivals: 4,559,400
  • Percentage increase: 79

Seoul, South Korea

  • 2017 arrivals: 7,659,100
  • 2025 arrivals: 13,229,700
  • Percentage increase: 73

Pattaya, Thailand

  • 2017 arrivals: 7,313,500
  • 2025 arrivals: 12,670,000
  • Percentage increase: 73

Hanoi, Vietneam

  • 2017 arrivals: 4,300,000
  • 2025 arrivals: 7,417,200
  • Percentage increase: 72

Hong Kong

  • 2017 arrivals: 25,695,800
  • 2025 arrivals: 44,058,900
  • Percentage increase: 71

Bangkok, Thailand

  • 2017 arrivals: 23,270,600
  • 2025 arrivals: 39,887,700
  • Percentage increase: 71

Singapore

  • 2017 arrivals: 17,618,800
  • 2025 arrivals: 30,194,000
  • Percentage increase: 71

Macau, China

  • 2017 arrivals: 16,299,100
  • 2025 arrivals: 27,907,800
  • Percentage increase: 71

Jeju, South Korea

  • 2017 arrivals: 2,429,400
  • 2025 arrivals: 4,165,100
  • Percentage increase: 71

Johor Bahru, Malaysia

  • 2017 arrivals: 5,571,400
  • 2025 arrivals: 9,360,900
  • Percentage increase: 68

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

  • 2017 arrivals: 16,010,000
  • 2025 arrivals: 26,787,800
  • Percentage increase: 67

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

  • 2017 arrivals: 4,000,000
  • 2025 arrivals: 6,663,600
  • Percentage increase: 67

Colombo, Sri Lanka

  • 2017 arrivals: 2,206,000
  • 2025 arrivals: 3,674,900
  • Percentage increase: 67